Renée Fleming visits DXARTS

Richard Karpen and Renée Fleming, photo by Max Weinstein-Bacal
Richard Karpen and Renée Fleming, photo by Max Weinstein-Bacal
The buzz about the research underway at the Center for Digital Arts and Experimental Media (DXARTS) attracted a high-profile visitor recently when world-renowned soprano Reneé Fleming, in town for an engagement with Seattle Symphony, paid a visit to DXARTS’ Art+Brain Lab. 
 
Fleming received a personal demo donning wearable sensors and learning more about results and methods for collecting data that have been developed over the course of the past several years at DXARTS. Professors Richard Karpen, Juan Pampin and Thomas Deuel, and Research Associate Marcin Paczkowski, demonstrated ongoing work with tools and technology—including Electroencaphalography (EEG) and Electromyography (EMG) machines–used to collect brain and muscle signals that can control a piano and software synthesizers.
 
Continuation of this research is made possible through a generous grant from the National Endowment for the Arts and by the Yamaha Corporation, providing support through its Disklavier, a robotic/acoustic piano that has performed a central role in presentation and refinement of the professors' music experiments.